Windows 10 Default app removal

Just a note to self…

Remove

Get-AppxPackage *xbox* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *windowsalarms* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *windowscommunicationsapps* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *windowscamera* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *windowsmaps* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *officehub* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *people* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *skypeapp* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *getstarted* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *zune* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *solitairecollection* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *bing* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *onenote* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *sway* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *messaging* | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage *phone* | Remove-AppxPackage

Get-AppxPackage drawboardpdf | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage freshpaint | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage SurfaceHub | Remove-AppxPackage
Get-AppxPackage flipboard | Remove-AppxPackage

List

Get-AppxPackage | Select-Object -expandproperty name

Reinstall

Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers| Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}

Source: www.howtogeek.com

How to lower USB headphone audio levels on Windows

When connecting my headphones via a simple USB-plug, the audio levels are often way, way, too loud. Today I had to turn the volume all the way down to 2% for the audio just to be OK’ish. That’s not very usable, and also kind of scary…

Finally found something to fix it!

  1. Install Equalizer APO
  2. Open up “C:\Program Files\EqualizerAPO\config\config.txt”
  3. Replace its contents with:
    Preamp: -30 dB
  4. And adjust that level as necessary…

Now I can finally use the volume bar in Windows, and the volume media keys on my keyboard properly. And no longer do I need to be afraid of suddenly having my eardrums shattered if the audio were to move a percentage or two… or, even worse, reset to max…

Batch convert SVG to PNG on Windows using Inkscape

Needed to convert several SVGs to PNG, and discovered the free Inkscape easily can be used in batch scripts.

The following .bat file will convert all SVGs dropped on it to a PNG with height 48 placed next to the original SVG. More options can be found in the Inkscape manual.

@echo off
for %%f in (%*) do (
    echo %%~f
    "C:\Program Files\Inkscape\inkscape.exe" ^
      -z ^
      --export-background-opacity=0 ^
      --export-height=48 ^
      --export-png="%%~dpnf.png" ^
      --file="%%~f"

)

Setting up GPG signing for Git/GitHub on Windows

What I did to get from working GPG to green and verified signatures for Git commits and tags on GitHub.

  1. Find the long id of the Signing key we want to use:
    🔶 $ gpg --edit-key alice
    gpg (GnuPG) 2.0.30; Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
    This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
    There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

    Secret key is available.

    pub  4096R/AA79CCAE  created: 2017-08-23  expires: never       usage: SC
                         trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
    sub  4096R/62275E24  created: 2017-08-23  expires: never       usage: S 👈
    sub  4096R/4AEA9524  created: 2017-08-23  expires: never       usage: E
    [ultimate] (1). Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>
    [ultimate] (2)  Alice Person (alice) <alice@example.org>

    🔶 gpg> quit

    🔶 $ gpg --list-secret-keys --keyid-format LONG alice
    sec   4096R/8C0BBECBAA79CCAE 2017-08-23
    uid                          Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>
    uid                          Alice Person (alice) <alice@example.org>
    ssb   4096R/6ADB9D4262275E24 2017-08-23 👈
    ssb   4096R/33F2E1644AEA9524 2017-08-23

    Note: So in this case we want 6ADB9D4262275E24

  2. Configure git and (optionally) make it sign all commits by default:
    🔷 $ git config --global user.name "Alice Person"
    🔷 $ git config --global user.email "alice.person@example.com"
    🔶 $ git config --global user.signingkey "6ADB9D4262275E24"
    🔷 $ git config --global commit.gpgsign true
    🔷 $ git config --global push.gpgsign if-asked
    🔶 $ where gpg
    C:\Program Files (x86)\GNU\GnuPG\pub\gpg.exe
    🔶 $ git config --global gpg.program "C:/Program Files (x86)/GNU/GnuPG/pub/gpg.exe"

    Note: If repo specific, just skip --global and run the command in the repo instead.

Test it…

  1. Do a commit:
    🔷 $ git init gpg-test
    🔷 $ cd gpg-test
    🔷 $ touch file.txt
    🔶 $ git commit -a -m "Signed commit"

    You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
    user: "Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>"
    4096-bit RSA key, ID 62275E24, created 2017-08-23 (main key ID AA79CCAE)

    [master (root-commit) 2814856] Works...?
     1 file changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
     create mode 100644 file.txt

    Note: One can also use the the -S option as alternative to using the commit.gpgsign true config, but as a forgetful person, I’d advice against that… Either set the config globally, or for the specific repo you need it for.

  2. Verify commit was signed:
    🔷 $ git log --show-signature
    commit 2814856365a07b3deb374f1337258102c06b77ef
    gpg: Signature made 08/23/17 06:18:50 W. Europe Daylight Time^M
    gpg:                using RSA key 6ADB9D4262275E24^M
    gpg: Good signature from "Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>" [ultimate]^M
    gpg:                 aka "Alice Person (alice) <alice@example.org>" [ultimate]^M
    Author: Alice Person <alice.person@example.com>
    Date:   Wed Aug 23 06:18:48 2017 +0200

        Signed commit
  3. Add a signed tag, using -s:
    🔶 $ git tag -s v1 -m "Signed tag"

    You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
    user: "Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>"
    4096-bit RSA key, ID 62275E24, created 2017-08-23 (main key ID AA79CCAE)

    Note: Unfortunately, unlike for commits, there is no tag.gpgsign true config as of writing, so to sign tags the -s option has to be remembered.

  4. Verify tag was signed:
    🔷 $ git tag -v v1
    gpg: Signature made 08/23/17 06:34:18 W. Europe Daylight Time
    gpg:                using RSA key 6ADB9D4262275E24
    gpg: Good signature from "Alice Person (alice) <alice.person@example.com>" [ultimate]
    gpg:                 aka "Alice Person (alice) <alice@example.org>" [ultimate]
    object 53e7f2e637eaf3c47b5dcad30b57be7b6829be02
    type commit
    tag v1
    tagger Alice Person <alice.person@example.com> 1503462856 +0200

    Signed tag

Add GPG key to GitHub

  1. Export the public key:
    🔶 $ gpg -a --export alice > public.txt
  2. Copy it.
  3. Go to GPG keys on GitHub.
  4. New GPG Key.
  5. Paste it.
  6. Add GPG Key.
  7. Pushed commits and tags should now look verified, as in this post: GPG signature verification

Sources: help.github.com, StackOverflow, git-scm.com

With a hint of Social Ineptitude